Join the choir

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We are currently looking for new members. If you think you might like to sing with us, drop in to Toll Gavel Methodist Church, Beverley (we are not a church choir) at 7.15pm on any Monday to watch us rehearse. Simply roll up and sit at the back to discover whether it might be for you.

There is no formal audition, no need to read music, and new members are provided with a choir “mentor” to ease their early membership. There is then a four-week induction period before you get your uniform.

 There are no Pavarotis or Robesons in our choir! You need only be able to sing in tune and to love doing so. Bass? Tenor? Dunno? We’ll tell you.

 There is not one of us who wasn’t initially nervous about joining a choir for the first time.  There is not one of us who has not often said, “wish I’d done it years ago!”

 We have a great time – so could you!

(Click to see full images and again to enlarge)

If you prefer it, contact:

Hon Secretary: Malcolm Mathias

admin@mgmhealthandsafety.co.uk

07866 917672

or

Chairman : Terry Lynn

terry@lynncave.karoo.co.uk

01430 423244

If having listened to us, and looked at us, you want to go straight ahead and submit an application, you will find a form attached to this page!  Print it off, send it in.

 

“Be sad for the lad who’ll sing not a minim.
He’ll leave us with all of his music still in ‘im”

The Times, 16th August 2016: “The Joy of Song”:

  • Singing is popular with dementia sufferers because memory for music is often preserved the longest.
  • It is also a way of maintaining social life, which can help people to stay independent longer.
     One study found that a choir’s heartbeats synchronise while singing, bringing a calming effect similar to meditation.
  • Choir membership appears to boost mental health according to some research.
    Singers have been found to have lower levels of the stress hormone cortisol
  • Singing seems to reduce anxiety and improve quality of life for cancer patients
  • The lungs and heart are also exercised in singing.
  • It can also be an effective exercise to counter stammering as it helps the sufferer to learn better control of breath and vocal muscles.”